Monica J. DeLateur is a dual-degree J.D./Ph.D. (Criminology & Justice Policy) student at Northeastern University. She is the creator and the former editor of the NULR Online Forum.

Karina I. Guzman is a third-year law student at Northeastern University School of Law and is the current editor of the NULR Online Forum. She is interested in the intersection between immigration law and criminal law.

Laurel A. Newman is a third-year law student at Northeastern University School of Law and Chair of the Cooperative Income Sharing Program. She is interested in pursuing estate planning, though with her background in criminal justice, criminal justice reform and juvenile crime prevention is still her passion.

Seth H. Barron is a third-year law student at Northeastern University School of Law. He currently serves as the Co-Chair of the American Constitution Society. He is interested in consumer protection law reform.

Brook Baker is a Professor at Northeastern University School of Law. He currently teaches Disability Law, Global AIDS Policy, and Negotiation and is an honorary research fellow at the University of KwaZulu Natal, S. Africa.  His scholarship and activism for the last twenty years has focused on intellectual property and trade policy, human rights, and access to medicines, particularly in the context of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.  He travels and consults globally with governments, multilateral institutions, and activists on access to medicines issues.

Ryan McGovern Quinn is a candidate for Juris Doctor, 2019, at the Northeastern University School of Law. He holds a master’s degree in Labor Studies from UMass Amherst, and is the former vice-president of United Auto Workers Local 2322 in Western Massachusetts, where he also served as a union servicing representative and organizer. He lives North of Boston with his wife, Lena, and their daughter, Virginia.

Jessica Silbey teaches constitutional law and intellectual property law at Northeastern University School of Law where she is the Co-Director of CLIC (Center for Law, Innovation and Creativity) at the School of Law.  She earned a J.D. and Ph.D. (Comparative Literature) from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and is the author of many articles and books, most recently The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators and Everyday Intellectual Property (Stanford Press 2015). Before joining the law faculty, she practiced law in Boston and clerked for several years in federal court.